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Short Biography

 

From "A Commentary of the Mathnavi of Moulana Jalaluddin Rumi (R.A.)"

BY HAZRAT MOULANA HAKIM MUHAMMAD AKHTAR SAHEB (DAAMAT-BARAKAATUHUM) VOLUME ONE I

 

Maulana Rumi's (RA.) name was Muhammad and his title was Jalaluddin but generally he became known as Maulana Rumi (RA.). He was born in the town of Balkh in 604 A.H. and belonged to the family of Hazrat Abu Bakr. His father's name was Bahauddin bin Hussain Balkhy. Muhammad Khwarizm Shah Balkhy (d 617) was his maternal grandfather. In 610 A.H. Maulana 's father, Bahauddin, left Balkh and settled in Nayshapur. On arrival at Nayshapur, his father took him to the famous saint, Khwaja Fariduddin Attar (RA.) Maulana Rumi (RA.) was then 6 years old. Khwaja Fariduddin (RA.) gave them a copy of his Mathnavi as a present and said to his father,

 

"Do not be negligent of this able one. He will one day make his voice heard. "

 

Maulana Rumi (RA.) acquired his initial instructions from his father. The father chose his most foremost student and Mureed to be a teacher and mentor to the young boy and in this manner Maulana Rumi (RA.) studied most of the branches of knowledge under this student, Maulana Burhanuddin (RA.). At the age of 18 years, Maulana Rumi (R.A.) got married and in that same year he went with his father to settle in Qunya.

 

When Maulana Rumi (RA.) was 25 years old, his father passed away. Maulana then went to Syria for the sole purpose of completing his studies. For some time, Maulana stayed at the Madrassa Jaladiya in Halb (Alepo) where he also sought the spiritual guidance and blessings of Kamaluddin bin Adeem (RA.). Thereafter for 7 years he went to study in Damascus. At Damascus, Maulana Rumi (RA.) studied all the Mazaahib, Ilmul Kalaam, Fiqah and acquired a good knowledge of all the differences of opinions in deeni matters. He was also highly qualified in philosophy and tasawwuf. After the death of his father, Sayed Burhanuddin (RA.) was also his mentor on the path of tariqat for 9 years. Thereafter he spent the rest of his life in teaching and lecturing.

 

 

SECOND PHASE OF MOULANA RUMI'S (R.A.) LIFE

 

A complete transformation came over Moulana's life from the moment he came into contact with Hazrat Shamsh Tabrezi (RA.). Shamsh Tabrezi (R.A.) was from a pious family which belonged to the Ismaili sect. He left his family sectarian connections, acquired knowledge and became a mureed of Baba Kamaluddin Jundy (RA.). In the company of the merchants he used to travel around from place to place.

 

Once he made a duah: "0 Allah, grant me the companionship of such a companion who will be able to bear my company". In reply to this duah the good news was given to him: "Go to Rum". He immediately set forth and soon reached Qunya where he arrived at a place of brass goods sellers. There was a platform whereupon the leaders always used to sit. It was at this place that the meeting between Moulana Rumi (RA.) and Shamsh Tabrezi (RA.) took place and from where their friendship and companionship commenced. From that day onwards, a complete change came over Moulana Rumi (RA.) and the fire of Divine love was kindled in his heart.

 

He avoided 'Sima', the listening to musical renderings. He also left teaching, lecturing and preaching. But he did not leave the company of Shamsh Tabrezi (R.A.) even for a little while.

 

However, a great commotion took place in the town with the result that Shamsh Tabrezi (R.A.) secretly left for Damascus. This caused Moulana tremendous sadness. After some time, some people noticing Moulana's discomfort and uneasiness, went to call Shamsh Tabrezi (R.A.) back. But after staying for a short while, he again disappeared to an unknown destination. Although they searched for him, he could not be found. Some historians are of the opinion that he had been martyred. After the disappearance of Shamsh Tabrezi (R.A.), Moulana Rumi (R.A.) suffered tremendous uneasiness, restlessness and loneliness. It was during this troubled period that he once happened to pass by the shop of Salahuddin Zarkoob who was busy beating metal into thin leaves. At that moment a strange condition came over Moulana. Salahuddin did not stop beating the leaves and thus many leaves were lost. Finally Salahuddin allowed the shop to become squandered away and he joined the company of Moulana Rumi (R.A.). In this manner he spent 9 years with Moulana. Through this companionship Moulana was greatly consoled.

 

In 664 A.H. Salahuddin passed away and after his death Moulana chose Husamuddin Chulpi (R.A.) from among his mureeds to be his companion for as long as he lived. Thereafter, Moulana consoled his heart through this new companionship. Moulana used to respect and honour Husamuddin (R.A.) to such an extent that people were under the impression that he was Moulana's spiritual guide. It was through the encouragement of Moulana Husamuddin (R.A.) that Moulana Rumi (R.A.) wrote the famous Mathnavi Shareef.

 

 

MOULANA RUMI'S (R.A.) SICKNESS AND DEATH

 

In 672A.H. a strong earthquake shook Qunya and for 40 days thereafter the vibrations were experienced. Moulana used to say that the earth was hungry and wanted a morsel. A few days thereafter Moulana became ill. Some very good physicians were called to treat him but to no avail and without success. On Sunday, the 5th Jamad-as-Thani 672, at the time of sunset, Moulana passed away.

 

The Janaza left the next morning. Everybody from the King to the poorest soul accompanied the Janaza. People were so emotional that they even broke the coffin in which the body was being transported for the sake of barakat. The Janaza reached the graveyard by the evening. Sheikh Sadruddin (RA.), a mureed of Sheikh Akbar Muhyuddin (RA.) together with his mureeds also followed the Janaza. He was appointed to lead the funeral prayer but as he stood ready to do so, he uttered a cry and fell unconscious. Thereafter, Qadi Sirajudd (RA.) lead the funeral prayers.

 

In accordance with the wasiyat of Moulana Rumi (R.A.), Hazrat Husamuddin (R.A.) became the Khalifa after him. Moulana left 2 sons; Ala-uddeen Muhammad and Sultan Wala. In 684 A.H., Hazrat Husamuddin (R.A.) also passed away and the next appointed Khalifa was Sultan Wala.

 

MOULANA'S WRITINCS

 

Among Moulana's writings is a compilation of his sayings under the title: IIFeehi maa jeehi". Then there is an anthology of 50 000 couplets which many people mistakenly consider to be the work of Shamsh Tabrezi (R.A.)

 

The third writing is the 'Mathnavi' through which Moulana is kept alive today in the world. It seems proper at this stage to just mention shortly some of the special features of this most famous work so as to have an insight into it.

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Stance of classical Ahle Sunnah scholars on Mawlana Jalaluddin Rumi

 

Question:

Could you please explain the stance of classical ahly sunnah scholars on mawlana jalaluddin rumi? Have scholars like Ibn Hajar al-Asqalani or Dhahabi said something about him?

 

Answer: assalamu `alaykum

Mawlana Jalal al-Din al-Rumi (d. 672 h.) was a recognized scholar of the Hanafi school, as were his father, son, and grandson, all being jurists of the highest caliber, as well as an Imam of the science of self-purification (ihsan).

 

In his compendium of Hanafi scholars, Abu’l Wafa’ al-Qurshi (d. 696 h.) introduces him as someone “knowledgeable of the [Hanafi] school, possessing vast understanding of juridical matters, thoroughly knowledgeable of juridical differences and other types of sciences.” [Jawahir al-Mudiyya]

 

Similarly, Ibn Qutlubugha (d. 879 h.), the great Hanafi jurist, stated in his Taj al-Tarajim after mentioning Mawlana Rumi’s lineage back to our liege=lord Abu Bakr (Allah be well pleased with him) that “he was knowledgeable of the legal schools, differences of opinion, and various types of sciences… and he composed many lines of poetry.”

On account of his mastery of the Islamic sciences, he was given the duty of teaching after the death of his father in the city of Konya (in modern day Turkey). He continued the task of instructing students in the outward sciences until his meeting with Shams al-Tabriz.

 

Perhaps more noteworthy than all of the above are the biographical notices on his son, Baha’ al-Din Ahmad, who was described in Ibn Hajar `Asqalani’s Durar al-Kamina as, “one of the Imams of the Hanafi Masters, brilliant, ascetic, pious, a jurist, scholar of legal methodology (usul), and grammarian…” and by al-Qurshi in his Jawahir as an “Imam… who followed his father in leaving the world behind.”

 

The reason why these notices on his son are significant is because he was one of the standard-bearers of his father, both in the outward and inward sciences. This is so much so that the foundations of the Mevlevi order are often stated to have been laid by Baha’ al-Din Ahmad and he, like his father, composed an array of Persian poetry.

All of this goes to show that Mawlana Jalal al-Din was nothing but an orthodox Sunni scholar who not only mastered the outward sciences but actualized the inward as well.

 

May Allah be well-pleased with him and those who followed him.

Salman

Checked & Approved by Faraz Rabbani

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Moulana Rumi and Whirling Zikr

 

Q: Are the sufi practices of Moulana Rumi such as the whirling Zikr acceptable in Islam and can he be considered to be a Wali (saint)?

A. Moulana Jalaaluddeen Rumi (Rahmatullaahi Alayh) was a Wali of a very high ranking, an Aalim and a master of Tasawwuf.

To attribute the ‘whirling Zikr’ to him is wholly incorrect. He never did this. This has been attributed to him by people who are unaware of him and his teachings.

Mufti Siraj adds:

The Sufis of old had a practice called Simaa’. This was a gathering of Sufis who were all 40 years of age or older, in which they would recite poems in Praise of Allah Ta’aala and His Rasool (Sallallaahu Alayhi wa Sallam). Due to their strong Love for Allah and His Rasool, these poems would have an extremely invigorating and inspiring effect on their hearts and souls, and would enhance their spiritual effulgence tremendously. In this gathering there were no dancing, or any musical instruments. Moulana Jalaaluddeen Rumi and his contemporary Sufis participated in this Simaa’.

However, later on this Simaa’ was modernized to include dancing and music, thus giving rise to the concept of “whirling dervishes”. This is a Bid’ah and is not the creation of orthodox Sufism.

Moulana Yusuf Laher

Checked by: Mufti Siraj Desai

 

Source

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The Mevlâna Museum

 

Mausoleo_Mevlana.jpg

 

located in Konya, Turkey, is the mausoleum of Jalal ad-Din Muhammad Rumi, a Persian Sufi mystic also known as Mevlâna or Rumi. It was also the dervish lodge (tekke) of the Mevlevi order, better known as the *whirling dervishes.

 

* Read previous post regarding the whirling dervishes

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Mevlana is not a Persian Sufi Mystic,He is Turkish. He is even accepted in Turkish Literaure. I think i can understand why Mevlana is is called of Persian Sufi Mystic, his piece Mesnevi, (his famous piece) was written in Persian. Just because of this, many people think that Mevlana is Persian. No! He is totally Turk and this has been proven by the Turkish Literature Professors also. The reason he wrote his piece Mesnevi in Persian was ,Persian was on those times a language which world knew. Most of Turkish poets wrote their pieces in Arabic or Persian. Just because Mevlana wrote his piece in Persian does that make him Persian? i dont think so. It feels me with sadness that Mevlanas nationality is always understood wrong.

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Assalaamu 'alaykum AishaZaynap

I think he is referred to as Persian as he was born in Balkh. His father moved to Konya when he was six years old....refer to first paragraph of the OP and this is what i've read in books too and Allah knows best. Anyway since he grew up and lived and worked in Turkey i suppose he is Turkish

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I think they havent seen his family tree? Stil today his family lives in Konya. I dont know how these people are doing their search?

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I've searched many sites and yes he did live in Konya however they all say Mawalana Rumi's (RA) father originated from Balkh  (now Afghanistan) and move to Konya when he was a young boy. (I'm not adding links to teh following because I'm not sure of the sites)

 

It says in one place that "This is a controversial topic, since Mawlana Rumi is claimed by the countries of Türkiye, Irân, and Afghanistân as "theirs."

 

and, As for Mawlânâ's ancestry, his family was from the region of Balkh (now located in the country of Afghanistan)....which was under Persian rule and hence him being called a "Persian" poet

 

 

In another place:

Childhood
Jalaluddin Rumi was born on September 30, 1207, in Balkh (in present-day Afghanistan). His father, Bahaduddin Walad, was a theologian, jurist and a mystic, while his mother was Mumina Khatun. When Mongols invaded Central Asia, between 1215 and 1220, Rumi left Balkh with his family and a group of disciples. The migrating caravan traveled extensively in Muslim lands, including Baghdad, Damascus, Malatya, Erzincan, Sivas, Kayseri and Nigde. After performing pilgrimage in Mecca, they eventually settled in Konya, located in the present-day western Turkey. At that time, Rumi’s father was an Islamic theologian, a teacher and a preacher.

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THE MATHNAVI

 

Towards the end of the Ghaznawi Empire Hakeem Sinai (RA.) wrote a book, "Hadeqah" which was the first book written on tasawwuf in a poetic form. After that Hazrat Fariduddin Attar (RA.) wrote many Mathnavis among which the most famous one was "Mantiquttayr". One day while Moulana Rumi (R.A.) was in a special state of ecstasy, he involuntarily uttered the first lines from the Mathnavi. Husamuddin Chalpi (RA.) heard it and insisted that Moulana should continue with it and complete the Mathnavi. Theresult was that six volumes were written. During the period of writing there were many lapses of time.
 

Hence we find quite a few couplets which were written wherein Husamuddin Chalpi (R.A.) was the cause for it being written. In some volumes Moulana had given a very good reason for the delay in writing, as for example:
"For quite some time, this Mathnavi has been delayed
It takes time for blood to become milk.
Until you are not blessed with another baby
The blood (in the body of the mother) would not transform into sweet milk."

 

The Mathnavi was commenced in 662 A.H.

 

WRITING STYLE

 

When writing on academic and ethical matters, one way of writing is to discuss one specific mas-ala (rulings of Shariah) separate from the others and at the same time to mention similar topics under one heading and division. Another manner is to write a certain story and thereafter deduce from it various "ilmi masalas" and provide explanation thereof. In this second manner the benefit derived is that the topic under discussion settles in the mind, which does not become tired thereof. This is the style which Moulana has adopted in the writing of the Mathnavi. Moulana himself says:

"0 Brother this story is like a shell
And the meaning in it is like a seed (in the shell)".

 

A grammarian said "Indeed Zayd hit Amr" (this was to show the nominative case of 'Zaidun' and the
accusative case of 'Amran'

The student (looking at the outer meaning) objected "Why did Zayd hit Amr without cause?" '
 

The Teacher said "This sentence is only a container for the meaning,
Just retain the grain and discard the shell.

 

The tale (sentence) of Zayd and Amr is constructed for explaining the case ending (of the subject and
the object), If this tale is untrue, you should (rather) worry about the case ending."

 

Of all the books written in Persian on this topic (tasawwuf and ethics), in no other book are such delicate and intricately sensitive issues mentioned. These issues abound in the Mathnavi. The Mathnavi is not only a book on tasawwuf and ethics, it also deals with dogma and metaphysics. Whether it deals with masail on tasawwuf or on matters of dogma, these are explained by way of examples, similes and metaphors in such a manner that no ground is left for rejection. The most complicated masail are clarified in such a manner that they become easy to understand. Not a single "masala" of the important points pertaining to tasawwuf and to ilmul Kalaam have been ignored..

 

The Mathnavi has been composed in 'Ramal' (a poetical method) that is hexagon curtailed. Its singular scale and beat is "Fa'ilatun, Fa'ilatun Fa'ilun" twice
 

In this Mathnavi, there is a musical nature in the words and letters used, a uniqueness in the expression
and clarity in its measure. Apart from that, the spiritual blessings, and the effect and the ecstatic feelings experienced in reading it, is quite overwhelming.

 

 

From "A Commentary of the Mathnavi of Moulana Jalaluddin Rumi (R.A.)"

BY HAZRAT MOULANA HAKIM MUHAMMAD AKHTAR SAHEB (DAAMAT-BARAKAATUHUM) VOLUME ONE I

 

 

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I've searched many sites and yes he did live in Konya however they all say Mawalana Rumi's (RA) father originated from Balkh (now Afghanistan) and move to Konya when he was a young boy. (I'm not adding links to teh following because I'm not sure of the sites)

 

It says in one place that "This is a controversial topic, since Mawlana Rumi is claimed by the countries of Türkiye, Irân, and Afghanistân as "theirs."

 

and, As for Mawlânâ's ancestry, his family was from the region of Balkh (now located in the country of Afghanistan)....which was under Persian rule and hence him being called a "Persian" poet

 

 

In another place:

Childhood

Jalaluddin Rumi was born on September 30, 1207, in Balkh (in present-day Afghanistan). His father, Bahaduddin Walad, was a theologian, jurist and a mystic, while his mother was Mumina Khatun. When Mongols invaded Central Asia, between 1215 and 1220, Rumi left Balkh with his family and a group of disciples. The migrating caravan traveled extensively in Muslim lands, including Baghdad, Damascus, Malatya, Erzincan, Sivas, Kayseri and Nigde. After performing pilgrimage in Mecca, they eventually settled in Konya, located in the present-day western Turkey. At that time, Rumi’s father was an Islamic theologian, a teacher and a preacher.

i understand this but what kind of a comment is this "This is a controversial topic, since Mawlana Rumi is claimed by the countries" this is ridicilous, plz everyone in the world knows Mevlana is Turk. How can someone who checked his family tree, can make such comments?

 

I will try to find a article about this...

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i understand this but what kind of a comment is this "This is a controversial topic, since Mawlana Rumi is claimed by the countries" this is ridicilous, plz everyone in the world knows Mevlana is Turk. How can someone who checked his family tree, can make such comments.

 

I will try to find a article about this...

they're saying its controversial because different countries are claiming that Mawlana Rumi was from their country...i.e. Turkey, Iran and Afghanistan all claim he was from their country.

 

Ok sure but please make sure of sources. The information I have posted is from the work of a Shaykh Shah Hakeem Akhtar (Raheemahullah) and "Ma-arife Mathnawi is widely acknowledged. The fatwas have their sources mentioned separately.

 

Happy hunting : )

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The Anatolian Mystic?

 

We receive quite a lot of emails at this site and the question most often asked is why we are calling Mevlana an Anatolian mystic. Although we answer almost all email we receive in person, we thought it may be better if we pre-answer that question here to save time.

Mevlana wrote almost all of his work in Persian (Farsi or Pharsi, the language of Iran), which was the dominating literary language of that period. His work is part of the school curriculum in Iran as it is in Turkey. So why not call him Iranian?

When someone is born in a different place than where he became famous, it is usually with the latter place that he is associated with. The famous composer George Frideric Haendel was born in Halle, Germany as a German citizen, but he became famous in England and nowadays he is mostly known as an English composer, his name is spelled in the Anglicized way as Handel and he is buried at the Westminster Abbey. Nevertheless, we have specifically refrained calling Mevlana Turkish, or Afhgani. Instead, we used the name of the geographic area where he lived, wrote and died.

Mevlana was born on 30 September 1207 in Balkh, in present day Afghanistan. He died on 17 December 1273 in Konya in present day Turkey.

Naturally, in 800 years the world's political map changed considerably. Countries that rule large parts of the world cease to exist (e.g. Ottoman Empire) and countries that used to cover extensive land shrink to become normal size countries that we expect nowadays (e.g. Great Britain and Iran. If you read the quote above you will see that we use the term "present day" next to the countries in where the two cities important to Mevlana's life are mentioned are situated. That is because neither Balkh, his birthplace, nor Konya, the place he spent most of his adulthood and where Mevlana wrote all his works are under the jurisdiction of the same countries as when he was alive. Balkh was a city of the vast Persian Empire then and Konya was a city under the jurisdiction of the Seljuks. Neither exist anymore.

On the other hand, it is a historical fact that "Rumi" simply meant Anatolian back in time and that is why Mevlana is called Mevlana Celaleddin Rumi. Rumi, from the word Roma, was loosely used for the land of the old Eastern Roman Empire. Even the Seljuk sultanate that ruled Konya while Mevlana was living there was called "Sultanate of Rum." It is this fact that made us call Mevlana Anatolian. more

Calling Mevlana Anatolian, is equal to calling him Rumi.
There has never been a country called Anatolia, it is a sub-continent. We call someone from Europe, European, or someone from Africa, African. Then why not call Mevlana Anatolian, when he is from Anatolia?

That is what we thought, but judging from the emails we keep receiving we were wrong in our assumption. Nevertheless, we will continue to stand by the use of the term "the great Anatolian mystic". At least we try to show you, the reader that we have no intention to "steal" Mevlana's heritage from any country or race. That is against Mevlana's philosophy and it will be the most wrong thing to do for the descendants of Mevlana.

In his own words:

Come, come over, more over, how long this brigandage?
As you are me and I am you. How long this discrimination of you and I?
We are light of GOD! Why this separation among us? Why light escapes from light?
We are all from the same yeast, our brains and heads too.
But under this bowed sky we see double?

Mevlana belongs to everyone.

Çelebi Family

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Assalaamu 'alaykum my young friend

You obviously feel very strongly about this.

 

Only my personel opinion but i feel such controversies should be left out and benefit reaped from his teachings. I love Ma-arife mathnawi. It was gifted to me years ago and i've treasured it ever since. I do read Rumi quotes online but i dont always understand so i prefer the beautiful explanations of the mashaikh who have spent time studying and translating Mawlana Rumi's work. There are beautiful lessons in Mawalna Rumi's work.

 

It shouldn't matter who claims him to be "theirs"....i reckon everyone is right to a certain extent. Iran, Balkh/Afghanistan were under Persian rule so he is Persian and he lived in Turkey which was under Roman rule so he is "Rumi" or Turkish/Anatolian!

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Wa alaikum salam dear ablacigim :)

 

Yes you are right. Mevlana belongs to everyone as stated by his family. so i will close this topic.

 

His teachings just amazing. His quotes itself gives us a minute to think over them. Mevlana loved people. He didnt look at nationality. He called people to Allah, even they were the worst sinners. This why Mevlana is knewed in the world :) I want to end this post with a beautiful quote from him

 

"Come, come, whoever you are. Wanderer, worshiper, lover of leaving. It doesn't matter. Ours is not a caravan of despair. come, even if you have broken your vows a thousand times. Come, yet again , come , come."

 

Rumi

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Wa alaikum salam dear ablacigim :)

 

Yes you are right. Mevlana belongs to everyone as stated by his family. so i will close this topic.

 

His teachings just amazing. His quotes itself gives us a minute to think over them. Mevlana loved people. He didnt look at nationality. He called to Allah, even they were the worst sinners. This why Mevlana is knewed in the world :) I want to end this post with a beautiful quote from him

 

"Come, come, whoever you are. Wanderer, worshiper, lover of leaving. It doesn't matter. Ours is not a caravan of despair. come, even if you have broken your vows a thousand times. Come, yet again , come , come."

 

Rumi

mashaAllah good idea to leave this topic.

 

as for the quote its beautiful however i'm sorry to have to say this but:

 

"This verse is not authentically ascribed to Mawlana Rumi"

 

See full answer here.

 

The quote is explained beautifully by Shaykh Faraz Rabbani so I'm glad this has come up Alhamdulillah! It is to do with repentance and I add an excerpt from the answer below:

 

 

[accurate translation: "Return (in repentance), return! Whatever you are, return! Even if you are an unbeliever or a Magian or an idol worshipper, return! This court of ours is not a court of despair. Even if you have broken your repentance a hundred times, return!"]

 

With this understanding, this poem is another expression of what the Messenger of Allah (peace and blessings be upon him) affirmed when He said, “Allah accepts a person’s repentance till their very last breath.” [Tirmidhi and Ibn Maja; with a sound chain]

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mashaAllah good idea to leave this topic.

 

as for the quote its beautiful however i'm sorry to have to say this but:

 

"This verse is not authentically ascribed to Mawlana Rumi"

 

See full answer here.

 

The quote is explained beautifully by Shaykh Faraz Rabbani so I'm glad this has come up Alhamdulillah! It is to do with repentance and I add an excerpt from the answer below:

 

 

[accurate translation: "Return (in repentance), return! Whatever you are, return! Even if you are an unbeliever or a Magian or an idol worshipper, return! This court of ours is not a court of despair. Even if you have broken your repentance a hundred times, return!"]

 

With this understanding, this poem is another expression of what the Messenger of Allah (peace and blessings be upon him) affirmed when He said, “Allah accepts a person’s repentance till their very last breath.” [Tirmidhi and Ibn Maja; with a sound chain]

oo this is intresting... im sorry i cant see the link posted is it possible to post it here the all answer?

 

oo Jazakillah :) im happy to see the accurate translation cos i wasnt sure about the quotes translation also.

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Here it is...

 

Question: Is the following poem wrongfully attributed to Rumi Rahmatullahialay

“Come, Come, Whoever you are Our is not a caravan of despair Come, Come, Whoever you are This caravan has no despair. Even though you have broken your vow perhaps ten thousand times Yet come again, come again, whoever you are whoever you are, come Wander, worshiper, lover of leaving, come Wander, worshiper, lover of leaving” ?

 

Answer: In the Name of Allah, Most Gracious, Most Merciful

Walaikum assalam wa rahmatullah,

 

I pray that this finds you well, and in the best of health and spirits. May Allah grant you all good and success in this life and the next.

 

This verse is not authentically ascribed to Mawlana Rumi. The meaning is sound, if we understand the “coming” mentioned as the coming of repentance, for repentance is a return to Allah Most High. Allah has called all His creation to ever-return to Him, from whatever state they are in to a higher state through repentance

Ibn Ajiba explains that,

 

“Repentance is returning from all reprehensible actions to all praiseworthy actions; or from all lowly traits to all radiant traits; or from beholding creation to being drowned in beholding the True God [Allah]. Its conditions are remorse; leaving; and negating returning…” [ibn Ajiba, Mi`raj al-Tashawwuf, 8-9]

 

The scholars mention that repentance has three levels:

[1] Repentance from disbelief through returning to belief;

[2] Repentance from disobedience through returning to obedience;

[3] Repentance from heedlessness through true turning to Allah Most High.

 

According to Sidi Ibrahim Gamart (of the very useful Dar al-Masnavi site),

 

“This is one of the most frequently quoted poems attributed to Rumi, but is not authenticated as his (and it is also not in the earliest manuscripts of the quatrains attributed to him). It is found in the same form in the quatrains of Bb Afzaluddn Kshn (died 1274– Rumi died 1273) and is related to a similar quatrain attributed to Abu Sa`d ibn Abi ‘l-Khayr, died 1048 (see “Nobody, Son of Nobody: Poems of Shaikh Abu-Saeed Abil-Kheir,” renditions by Vraje Abramian, 2001, p. 4, c). It is one among the most frequently quoted poems by Turkish Mevlevis (the “Whirling Dervishes”) themselves (who have long assumed it to be a Rumi poem), from a Turkish translation of the original Persian.” [ref]

 

Further he offers a sounder translation, noting that:

 

“Come again, please, come again,

Whoever you are.

Religious, infidel, heretic or pagan.

Even if you promised a hundred times

And a hundred times you broke your promise,

This door is not the door

Of hopelessness and frustration.

This door is open for everybody.

Come, come as you are.”84

 

[accurate translation: "Return (in repentance), return! Whatever

you are, return! Even if you are an unbeliever or a Magian or an

idol worshipper, return! This court of ours is not a court of despair.

Even if you have broken your repentance a hundred times,

return!"]

 

With this understanding, this poem is another expression of what the Messenger of Allah (peace and blessings be upon him) affirmed when He said, “Allah accepts a person’s repentance till their very last breath.” [Tirmidhi and Ibn Maja; with a sound chain]

 

And Allah alone gives success.

Faraz Rabbani

Seekersguidance

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This door is not the door

Of hopelessness and frustration.

This door is open for everybody.

Come, come as you are

 

Beautiful! This Ramadhaan may we all enter through this door and be purified! In fact why wait for Ramadhaan?

 

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