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Menstruating Women & the Masjid/Musallah

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1. The woman who is in haid it is not permissible for her to enter a mosque

 

 

:assalam: :)

 

 

Why is it not permissible for a menstruating woman to enter mosque? Reason? whats the basis of this ruling? Just want to know. If you know, please share.

 

:jazak:

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:wasalam:

 

Here are the proofs provided by Mufti Abdur Rahman Mangera

http://www.islamicteachings.org/forum/topic/20365-proofs-for-the-impermissibility-of-women-touching-the-quran-or-entering-the-masjid/

 

Also:

Hadith of the Prophet (Allah bless him and give him peace),

“I do not permit [entering] the masjid for the junub or menstruating woman.” (Bukhari)

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A menstruating woman can enter areas which are not designated as the Masjid.

In a building the Jam'at area is usually designated as the Masjid so a seminally defiled person or menstruating woman cannot enter that area. Many Masaajid have classes for women in the area outside of the "Masjid"..see below

 

 

Answered by Shaykh Faraz Rabbani

1) Would it be permissible for a menstruating woman who teaches in an Islamic School/Sunday School to teach if the class takes place in a designated classroom within the mosque (not inside the musallah)?

2) Same question regarding a menstruating woman who goes to the mosque regularly for Arabic/Tajweed classes? 

Answer:bism01.jpg

 

Walaikum assalam,

This would depend how the mosque was designated when it was laid-out. In most multi-purpose mosques, it is only the prayer area that is designated as a mosque, and the classrooms and other facilities are not part of the mosque. If this is the case, then a menstruating woman may enter such areas, though not the prayer area, because of the clear hadiths prohibiting this.

 

The same ruling would apply to the classes you asked about.

Wassalam,Faraz Rabbani

 

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The following is part of Fiqh of Masjid & Musallah

Answered by Shaykh Abdurrahman ibn Yusuf Mangera

 

 

There is a difference between a masjid and a musallā (or jamāt khāna). A musalla (or jamāt khāna) literally means a place where prayer is performed or where congregations are held, or worded differently, any temporary place in which worshippers congregate to perform their prayers. A musalla is also a place that has not been made an endowment or not yet intended to become a permanent masjid until the Last Day. In many cases, it is a temporary place from which the community will transfer once they find a more suitable, convenient, or permanent location. Though Muslims today commonly refer to their musallā as their masjid, which the literal meaning of masjid (a place where the prostration is made) allows, a musallā cannot technically be considered a legal [shari] masjid. Likewise the reward for prayer in a musallā is not the same as in a proper masjid.

 

 

It would be permissible for menstruating women to enter into a musalla to attend classes or lectures. Performing prayer therein would not hold the same reward as praying in a masjid although it would be more than in the home.

 

A hadīth related by Ibn Hajar al-Asqalānī from Abdullāh ibn Amr ibn al-Ās states that the reward for a congregation with ones family members (aside from in a masjid) holds 15 times the reward of praying alone, whereas praying it in the congregation in the masjid holds twenty five times the reward. Ibn Hajar al-Asqalānī concludes that the 25 times extra reward is confined to performing it in congregation in the masjid and not in a congregation performed at home. See Fath al-Bārī 106, Mirqāt al-mafātīh 3:145, and al-Bahr al-rāiq 1:346 It would be permissible to eat or sleep in a musalla without having the intention of itikāf, which is necessary in the masjid for one to eat or sleep. One can also perform Tahiyyat al-Masjid in a musalla. A useful setup for womens prayer could be that there be two room: one connected to the back of the mens prayer area, which could be intended as being included in the shari masjid; and another room behind the first room, which could be a musalla or a multi purpose room for menstruating women or women with children to stay in.

 
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  There is a difference between a masjid and a musallā (or jamāt khāna). A musalla (or jamāt khāna) literally means a place where prayer is performed or where congregations are held, or worded differently, any temporary place in which worshippers congregate to perform their prayers. A musalla is also a place that has not been made an endowment or not yet intended to become a permanent masjid until the Last Day. In many cases, it is a temporary place from which the community will transfer once they find a more suitable, convenient, or permanent location. Though Muslims today commonly refer to their musallā as their masjid, which the literal meaning of masjid (a place where the prostration is made) allows, a musallā cannot technically be considered a legal [shari] masjid. Likewise the reward for prayer in a musallā is not the same as in a proper masjid. - See more at: http://www.islamicteachings.org/forum/topic/21422-menstruating-women-the-masjidmusallah/#sthash.yPmSys8N.dpuf

 

 

A menstruating woman can enter areas which are not designated as the Masjid.

 

- See more at: http://www.islamicteachings.org/forum/topic/21422-menstruating-women-the-masjidmusallah/#sthash.yPmSys8N.dpuf

 

 

:jazak: This thread helped a lot. Thank you very much :)

 

I don't understand the difference between Masjid and Musalla. 

 

Are  Hidha not allowed to enter into Masjid? And are they allowed to enter into Musallah? That's confusing. Could you please simplify it for me?

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Ok first read the red text in post number 4.

 

Now lets see if we can make it easy inshaAllah.

 

When people build a masjid, they have to designate the area of the masjid i.e. make an intention that this area, from here to here is the masjid. Now that area only is the masjid. Sometimes it can be the whole building or just part of it which is actually the "Shar'ee Masjid"

 

So if it was a huge building with many rooms and  a alrge hall area (like in the UK) then the hall area and maybe another adjoining room is designated as the "Masjid". The rest of the rooms can be used as the Masjid when a lot of people gather like on a Friday. Those rooms can also be used for teaching and other activities so if a female teacher was in the state of menstruation she can enter those rooms because these rooms are not a Shar'ee Masjid.

 

A Musallah is like a temporary masjid (like in a shopping mall or many shops here have a small room behind where shoppers can perform their salaah) or the 'eidghah (the area outside the township where 'Eid salaah is performed). Therefore a menstruating woman cannot enter a "Masjid" however she can enter a "Musallah.

 

Hope this helps inshaAllah. If not please ask

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Ok first read the red text in post number 4.

 

Now lets see if we can make it easy inshaAllah.

 

When people build a masjid, they have to designate the area of the masjid i.e. make an intention that this area, from here to here is the masjid. Now that area only is the masjid. Sometimes it can be the whole building or just part of it which is actually the "Shar'ee Masjid"

 

So if it was a huge building with many rooms and  a alrge hall area (like in the UK) then the hall area and maybe another adjoining room is designated as the "Masjid". The rest of the rooms can be used as the Masjid when a lot of people gather like on a Friday. Those rooms can also be used for teaching and other activities so if a female teacher was in the state of menstruation she can enter those rooms because these rooms are not a Shar'ee Masjid.

 

A Musallah is like a temporary masjid (like in a shopping mall or many shops here have a small room behind where shoppers can perform their salaah) or the 'eidghah (the area outside the township where 'Eid salaah is performed). Therefore a menstruating woman cannot enter  a "Masjid" however she can enter a "Musallah.

 

Hope this helps inshaAllah. If not please ask

 

:jazak:

 

Understood.

 

To clarify one last question, If there's a big hall and in the mid of that hall there are lots of prayer mats where namazi are offering salah.  But around the edges of the hall there's no prayer mat and no one is offering salah  and  there's a row of chairs,  then could Haidha  women sit there on chair?  

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:jazak:

 

Understood.

 

To clarify one last question, If there's a big hall and in the mid of that hall there are lots of prayer mats where namazi are offering salah.  But around the edges of the hall there's no prayer mat and no one is offering salah  and  there's a row of chairs,  then could Haidha  women sit there on chair?  

 

Its nothing to do with where the prayer mats are Marryam. Its to do with a particular  area being designated as a Masjid.

 

The only way we would know which area is part of the Masjid is to ask the Zummedaar of the Masjid (Those responsible for the Masjid). Now in the example you've given, if they have designated only the area with the prayer mats as a masjid then it would be fine for the Haaidhah to sit on the side (as long as there are no men there). Usually however its whole rooms designated as Masjids and not just the centre of it.

 

Here in the UK we usually know that the wide passages and classrooms are not part of the Masjid so when we go for lectures we go in through back doors (if any) and go straight to those areas without going even near the main Jamaa'at khana. Usually the Jamaa'at khana (Masjid) would be where men would be and the speaker speaking through the mike system so women can hear in the other rooms or even upstairs.

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Its nothing to do with where the prayer mats are Marryam. Its to do with a particular  area being designated as a Masjid.

 

The only way we would know which area is part of the Masjid is to ask the Zummedaar of the Masjid (Those responsible for the Masjid). Now in the example you've given, if they have designated only the area with the prayer mats as a masjid then it would be fine for the Haaidhah to sit on the side (as long as there are no men there). Usually however its whole rooms designated as Masjids and not just the centre of it.

 

Here in the UK we usually know that the wide passages and classrooms are not part of the Masjid so when we go for lectures we go in through back doors (if any) and go straight to those areas without going even near the main Jamaa'at khana. Usually the Jamaa'at khana (Masjid) would be where men would be and the speaker speaking through the mike system so women can hear in the other rooms or even upstairs.

 

:jazak: for clarifying  :) 

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